Old Ilkeston Logo

End of East Street

(Carrier tenants and workers)

We are now nearing the end of East Street – not the modern-day East Street but the street as it was in the mid-nineteenth century when it ended approximately at the point where it is today joined by High Street.

Old Mr. Meakin.

Past the entry in East Street was old Mr. Meakin’s house.

Aged 68 when Adeline was born, ‘old Mr. Meakin’ was plumber, painter and glazier Thomas, son of William and Elizabeth, and married to Ann (nee Phillips), daughter of John and Sarah, in August 1811.
There were at least 12 children in the family, one of whom – Sophia — gave evidence in the George Smith murder trial.
The eldest child, Eliza, will appear shortly as we progress down Burr Lane into Albion Place.
Eliza’s younger sister Caroline married Thomas Riley in December 1834, the agent for the Erewash Canal Company. He was the son of Thomas, grocer of Bath Street, who was the son of  Thomas, framework knitter, who was the son of  Thomas, stocking maker, who was the son of … John?

Also to settle in Albion Place, shortly after his marriage to Caroline Straw, eldest child of coalminer William and Fanny (nee Curtis) in 1851, was son Thomas Meakin junior, like his father a plumber and glazier, though also a silk warp hand.

Ann Meakin died in 1855, aged 64 and Thomas senior died in February 1863, aged 77, both of them ‘much respected’.

James Goddard, joiner and builder.

Then came the two new houses built by the late Mr. James Goddard, joiner and builder, at the bottom of East Street, and carried on his business at the rear.

The houses of James Goddard junior were almost opposite High Street at what was in the 1860’s the end of East Street. Burr Lane began at what is now the Albion Centre car park.

James was the oldest surviving son of framework knitter and Chelsea Pensioner James senior and Sarah (nee Barker).
In January 1846 he had married Elizabeth Ball, daughter of Francis and Mary (nee Hirst) and sister to Francis Ball, (See And Balls). They lived all their married life at 11 East Street, died there in 1890 and 1895 respectively, and perhaps fittingly were buried together in Ilkeston General Cemetery.

He had two sons and two daughters.

Three of their children — Lavinia, Francis (Frank) Herbert and Mary Elizabeth — lived with them.

Henry went into the Civil Service, and was stationed at Nottingham.
The oldest son, Henry Samuel, worked in the Inland Revenue Department of the Civil Service and left to live in Derby and then Nottingham where in December 1891 he married Florence Doyle Garratt.

Frank, who I think is still living, followed his father as a builder.
The daughters were Lavinia and Mary.
Joiner and carpenter Frank was alive at the time of Adeline’s letters, and died in 1944, 13 years after sister Lavinia.
Both died at 1 Park Drive, and were buried together at nearby Park Cemetery.
Both Frank and Lavinia were received into communion by the Ilkeston Independent Church on March 29th 1871.
Mary Elizabeth lived with Frank and Lavinia and died in 1924, also at 1 Park Drive. She was buried with her parents.
Both family graves can still be found at the two cemeteries.

Their other son, William Clarke Goddard, died in infancy in January 1854.

 

The other cottage was occupied at one time by Mr. William Attenborough, the cricketer, and I believe he died there.

Cricketer William Attenborough was the second son of Mark and Alice (nee Mitchell) and we shall meet the family at the Sir John Warren Inn.

Gap Alert!! So far I have found no evidence of his life in East Street. I believe he died in 1894 at 42 South Street.

 

And if we glance across the road we can see the Wine Vaults. Fancy another drink?!!