Old Ilkeston Logo

Richard Birch Daykin (by John Daykin)

Richard Birch Daykin (17/8/1850 – 6/4/1899) was the sixth of seven children and the second son born in Ilkeston to Richard and Anne Daykin (nee Clemenson). On Richard Birch Daykin’s birth certificate his father, Richard is described as a Carpenter by trade, with the birth being registered on the 23rd August.

The first census in which Richard Birch Daykin appeared was the 1851 Census on the 30th March, where the surname for each family member was spelt without the “Y”. Richard Dakin, his father, was aged 43; Ann Dakin, his mother aged 41, sisters Emma, aged 21; Elizabeth, aged 17; Anna, aged 14; Richard B. aged 7 months, and lastly George Chanison aged 22, an Engineer from Laughton, Leicestershire, but the surname appears to be incorrectly translated from the written document and should maybe read Clemmison, which means that he is a relative of Richard Daykin’s wife Ann (nee Clemenson / Clemmison).

In the 1861 Census taken on the 7th April, Richard Birch Daykin is now 10 years old and his young brother Henry F. is 8 year old and both are listed as scholars, his elder sister Anna is 20 years old and they are all living at South Street in Ilkeston.

In the late 1860’s Richard Birch’s parents and their youngest son, Henry Frederick, migrated to live in Little Hallam, leaving Richard Birch to live on in South Street and take over the running of the grocery business now that he’d reached adulthood.

Richard Birch Daykin went on to marry Sarah Anne Bonsall on the 15th October 1867 at the Holy Trinity Church in Nottingham. Sarah Anne Bonsall had been born on the 28th June 1850 to James and Sarah Bonsall (nee Watts) at 125 Clay Croft, Clay Lane, Clay Cross, which is in the sub-district of Ashover, Derbyshire.

James Bonsall’s occupation was given on the certificate as a Collier and the birth was notified by his wife Sarah on the 1st July 1850, who was apparently illiterate as the register just bears a cross with the comment “The mark of Sarah Bonsall Mother” written alongside.

According to the information on Richard and Sarah’s marriage certificate Richard Birch Daykin was a 17 year old Bachelor, a Grocer by profession, residing in Ilkeston and was the son of Richard Daykin, a Carpenter by trade. Richard’s trade had been incorrectly written as “Lace Manufacturer” on the certificate and then crossed out and “Carpenter” written above it. Sarah Ann Bonsall was a 17 year old Spinster, no apparent rank or profession, residing at Matlock Street, the daughter of James Bonsall a “Contractor”. Apparently after Richard and Sarah’s marriage her parents went to live at Bonsall Place, off Bath Street in Ilkeston.

James Bonsall had previously been employed as a coal miner and a publican, as according to the 1851 Census for 126 Sellar Row, Ashover Chesterfield, James Bansall (spelt incorrectly) was the Head, aged 32, born 1819, and a Coal Miner by profession; his wife Sarah was aged 30, born in 1821; their children; Joseph, 11, was born in Alfreton same as his parents; Hannah, 8; James, 4; George, 2; all Scholars, and Sarah A. aged 9 months; all born Clay X Derbyshire. There is a record of a Sarah Watts being baptised in June 1820 in Alfreton to Henry and Sarah Watts.

By the following Census in 1861 James was now a Coal Miner and Publican living at The Rose and Crown, Woodthorpe Village, Clay Cross, aged 42, his wife Sarah was a Coal Miners Wife aged 40 and their eldest child, Joseph aged 21 was also a Coal Miner. The oldest daughter Hanah was 18, and no occupation listed. The remaining children James, 14, George, 12, Sarah Anne, 10, William, 8 and Emily, 6 are all Scholars and finally Amelia, 1; all born in Clay Cross.

James Bonsall’s wife, Sarah had died on August 10th 1869 age 49 and he remarried Mary Tooth in the December quarter 1869.  Mary is believed to have been christened on December 17th 1819 at Saint Werburgh, Derby to Charles and Anne Tooth. On the 1871 Census for Bonsall Place, off Bath Street, Ilkeston James Bonsall is listed as  Head, 52, Contractor; Mary, Wife, 51; both born Alfreton; Emily, Daughter, 16, Apprentice; Amelia, Daughter, 11, Scholar; both born Clay Cross; Walter, Son, 9, born Tupton.

On the 1881 Census for 3, Bonsall Place, Ilkeston, James Bonsall is Head, 62, Retired Ironstone Miner, born Greenhill Lane Derbyshire; Mary, Wife, 61, born Derby; Walter, Son, Unmarried, 19, Apprentice Carpenter, born Tupton.

James Bonsall’s second wife, Mary (nee Tooth) is believed to have died in the December quarter of 1885 aged 63.

There was a newspaper article printed in the “Derby Mercury” on Wednesday 28th July 1886 which reported the marriage of Amelia, one of James Bonsall’s daughters…

“On Tuesday, the wedding of Mr. Thomas Adlington, and Amelia, daughter of Mr. James Bonsall, colliery proprietor, Ilkeston, was celebrated in a manner which attracted much attention. The wedding was solemnised at the Parish Church, Ilkeston, before the Rev. J. F. N. Eyre LLD. Vicar. The bridal party were driven to church in carriages with postilions clad in scarlet – quite a novel sight in Ilkeston. The gifts to the bride were very numerous. Mr. and Mrs. Adlington left for London to spend the honeymoon. The bride’s dress was made of fawn Ottoman silk, trimmed with lace and orange blossoms, and she wore a diamond bracelet, the gift of the bridegroom. The bridesmaids were Miss Adlington (Ollerton), Miss Rowley (Derby), Misses Edith, Jessie, and Lizzie Daykin, each of whom wore a gold brooch, the gift of the bridegroom. The bells of the Parish Church rang joyous peals at intervals during the day”…        

Apparently James Bonsall went to live with his daughter Amelia and her husband Thomas, as according to the 1891 Census for 115 Bath Street, Ilkeston… “Thomas Adlington, Head, Married, 32, Baker and Confectioner, born Notts, ??; Amelia, Wife, 31, born Derbyshire, Clay Cross; Ethel B., Daughter, 3; Harry R., Son, 2; both born Derbyshire, Ilkeston; Harriet E. Hart, Servant, 15, General servant, born Stanley Brick Yard; James Bonsall, Boarder, Single, 72, Coal Mining Contractor, born Alfreton, Greener Lane, Derbyshire”…

James Bonsall died on December 16th 1893 age 75.

According to the National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations)… “Bonsall James of Ilkeston Derbyshire Gentleman died 16 December 1893 Probate London 23 February to Charles Potts Chemist and Fred Bowler Butcher. Effects £933 17s. 2d. resworn April 1894 £1,203 17s. 2d.”…

The whereabouts of James Bonsall, or either of his wives burial plots are not known.

Richard Birch and Sarah Ann Daykin went on to have eleven children over the coming years, (seven sons and four daughters) all born in Ilkeston; Annie was born in the June Qtr. of 1868; Thomas Bayley born the 23rd November 1869; Jessie born the June Qtr. of 1871; Edith (Emily) born the December Qtr. 1872; Lissie, born Elizabeth Helena in June Qtr. 1875; Richard Birch (Jnr.) born the March Qtr. of 1877 ; James William born the June Qtr. of 1878; Henry Frederick born the December Qtr. 1880; George L. born c. 1881; Cecil Charles born the 7th May 1884; and the youngest child and seventh son, Septimus Claude, born in the June Qtr. of 1886.

The “Sheffield Daily Telegraph” carried a story on the 16th October 1869 regarding Richard Birch Daykin.

“A Young Shoplifter.- Walter Tomlinson, a boy of between ten and eleven years of age, living at Ilkeston, was charged by Urban Udall, plumber, Ilkeston, with stealing a brass tap, value 6s. On the 24th ult. prisoner called at prosecutor’s shop and asked his wife if his mother could have a shilling bucket. He did not get one, but called at the shop a second time, offering a brass tap for one, and got it. Upon the prosecutor’s return home in the evening he missed the tap from his shop, and gave information to the police, who found prisoner with the bucket in his possession. Prisoner was also charged with stealing three scrubbing brushes from a shop at Ilkeston, in the occupation of Richard Birch Daykin. Prisoner stole the brushes from the shop door and sold them for 1s. 9d.
He admitted both charges, and was sent to prison for fourteen days, the magistrates informing him that if he appeared before them again he would be sent to a reformatory”…

In the 1871 Census on the 2nd April, Richard Birch Daykin was a 20 year old Grocer, his wife Sarah Anne a 20 year old Grocer’s Wife, and their children, Anne age 3, and Thomas Bailey age 1 are listed as Scholars, and all the family resided at 63 South Street.

The “Sheffield Daily Telegraph” printed various licence applications on the 30th September 1873, including;-

“The application of… and Richard Birch Daykin for wine licenses were granted”…

The “Nottinghamshire Guardian” printed a similar application on Friday 3rd October 1873;-

“Richard Birch Daykin, South Street, Ilkeston, applied for a license to sell sweets”…

Richard Birch Daykin and his wife Sarah continued to run the grocery business up until the shop, along with others, was taken over by the Cooperative Society in 1874, when the business was at 62 South Street.

Richard Birch Daykin then became a cab proprietor, where, by the summer of 1879 he was using the stables at the Rutland Hotel in his trade after the bankruptcy of George Spouge, who had previously been based there. George had conducted his carrier business from the stables up until he was declared bankrupt in February 1879 and the liquidation of his assets in March to pay his creditors. Although Richard Birch Daykin had relocated his business he continued to live at South Street.

According to “Wright’s Directory of Nottingham”… “Daykin Richard Birch, cab proprietor, livery stable keeper, harness and carriage repository, v, Rutland Arms, and Railway Commercial Hotel, Bath-street”…

According to the 1881 Census on the 3rd April (and also Kelly’s 1881 Directory) Richard Birch Daykin was aged 30, employing two men, living at 62 South Street Ilkeston along with his wife Sarah Ann, (also aged 30)  and their eight children;  Lissie (D) aged 6, Edith (D) 9, Jessie (D) 10, Annie (D) 13, Henry F. (S) 6 months, Willie (S) 3, Birch (S) 4 (Richard Birch), Bayley (S) 10 – (Thomas Bayley), and a servant called Mary Webster aged 22 from Codnor in Derbyshire.

Richard Birch apparently continued with his cab business up until 1884 when he became the proprietor of the Rutland Hotel after the retirement of the incumbent licensee, Mary Hives. The Hives family had run the hotel since 1830 when baker and flour dealer John Ives was listed in “Pigots Directory” as landlord, followed by his son, Thomas after his death in 1834.

The “Derby Daily Telegraph” – Thursday 1st May 1884 – “Licence Transfers,- The following licence transfers were granted at Heanor Petty Sessions on Monday.-… Ilkeston; Rutland Hotel, Mary Hives to Richard B. Daykin”…

Richard had only been the landlord for less than twelve months when he was attacked by a customer… “Derby Mercury” – Wednesday 4 February 1885… “ILKESTON. STRANGE AFFAIR IN AN HOTEL.- In the Rutland Hotel, Ilkeston, on Wednesday, a commercial traveler named Murray, representing a Scotch firm of linen manufacturers, made a desperate attack on Mr. R. B. Daykin, the landlord, and others present. Murray had been doing business in the town, and was sent to the Rutland Hotel to get a room for the night. When the landlord, for some reason or other, declined to provide him with a room, he attempted to assault him and was put into the taproom. He there dashed the seats about, and on getting outside took a knife out of his pocket and rushed at a gentleman standing by. He was seized, and the knife taken from him. Then he was put into a sitting-room, where he smashed the flower pots, and on Mr. Daykin telling him he would have to pay for them he put his hand in his pocket as if to do so, but suddenly struck Mr. Daykin a heavy blow on the face”…

Richard Birch was subject to a further assault … “Derby Mercury” – Wednesday 3 November 1886… “ASSAULTING A LANDLORD.- George Dilks was summoned by Mr. Daykin, landlord of the Rutland Arms Hotel, Ilkeston, for assaulting him on October 23.- Defendant had had a dispute with the waiter as to some change, and Mr. Daykin was sent for. As the waiter avowed that he gave the man the proper money the complainant refused to take any further notice of the charge, whereupon Dilks threw the beer he had in the jug over Mr. Daykin, which constituted the assault.- Defendant admitted the assault, but pleaded provocation, and called a witness to say that the waiter afterwards admitted he had made a mistake.- Fined 5s. and 11s 6d. costs”…

Apart from being a landlord, Richard Birch Daykin, along with his younger brother, Henry Frederick Daykin, and brother-in-law, Elijah Higgitt (who was married to his older sister Elizabeth) played a prominent part in the activities of the local building society. The “Derby Daily Telegraph” – Saturday 30 July 1887… “ILKESTON. BUILDING SOCIETY.- The thirty-fourth annual meeting of the shareholders of the Ilkeston Permanent Benefit Building Society was held in the Town Hall, Ilkeston on Thursday evening. Mr. E. Higgitt in the chair.- The annual report stated that the subscriptions for 1886 were £1,990 12s. 8d., and the redeemed mortgages £1,650 2s 9d. Fresh mortgages to the amount of £1,318 had been advanced, and the withdrawals and interest amounted to £1,778 3s. 8d. The balance in bank was £1,835 2s. 6d. The retiring directors were Messrs. E. Higgitt, H. F. Daykin, and R. B. Daykin, and they were all re-elected. Mr. J. Cope was appointed shareholder’s auditor”…

There was another altercation in the Rutland Hotel, reported in the “Derby Mercury” on Wednesday 15 February 1888… “REFUSING TO QUIT.- William Cholerton was summoned by Mr. R. B. Daykin, of the Rutland Hotel, Ilkeston, for refusing to quit licensed premises on January 28.- Fined 5s and 9s. 6d. costs”…

Richard Birch Daykin remained the proprietor of the Rutland Arms Hotel for a short while after this incident before the family moved to live in Staffordshire, where, according to the 1891 Census on the 5th April he had taken over the tenancy of The Roebuck Hotel, 134 Solo Hill, Handsworth Staffordshire.

On the Census, Richard Birch Daykin was the Publican, (40), his wife Sarah Ann (40), who’s birthplace is noted as being “Danesmoor” was the Landlady, their eldest daughter Jessie (20) was a Barmaid, Richard (14), James William (13), Henry F. (12) George L. (10), Cecil Charles (7), are all listed as scholars, and finally Septimus Claude, the youngest at 4 years old. All the children were listed as born in Ilkeston.

A couple of years after the census was made Richard Birch Daykin and family moved to Birmingham, where he took over the tenancy of the “Kings Head” in Dudley Street, Birmingham.

The “Birmingham Daily Post” on Friday 7th April 1893 contained an article on the transfer of public house licenses.

“A special session for the transfer of licenses was held at the Birmingham Police Court, yesterday morning, before Messrs. L. Brierley, H. J. Manton, and R. Cadbury, and the following licenses were transferred :-
… “Full Licensed.- …King’s Head, Dudley Street, to R. B. Daykin…”…

The transfer of the license didn’t succeed however as objections were made to the licensing magistrates and an article in the “Birmingham Daily Post” on Friday the 22nd September 1893 carried the full story.

“Birmingham Adjourned Licensing Sessions.- The adjourned Licensing Sessions for the city were held yesterday at the Victoria Courts. The Magistrates present were the Mayor (chairman), Messrs. G. B. Lloyd, J. D. Goodman, Harris, Wallis, Gilliver, Leach, Ryland, H. Chamberlain, J. H. Stone, Marris.

Objections To Renewal.-  The first case taken was that of Richard Birch Daykin King’s Head, Dudley Street. The objection was that the house was not required to supply the wants of the neighbourhood ; that the house had been kept in a disorderly manner, and that a previous licensee was convicted in December, 1892, for allowing betting on the premises. Mr. Hugo Young (instructed by Mr. Redfern) applied for the renewal, and said that in connection with the offences for which the conviction was recorded there was nothing found in the house to connect the license-holder with betting: and called attention to the remarks made by the Bench at the conviction, when it was said by the Magistrates that they did not think the landlord was cognisant at what was going on. They added that it was not a case for a heavy fine. Mr. Daykin was justified for going into the house after what the Magistrates had said”…

The appeal against the transfer of licence for the “Kings Head” continued for Richard Birch with an appearance at the Crown Court in October which was reported in the “Coventry Evening Telegraph” on Thursday the 19th October 1893…

“THE QUARTER SESSIONS – A PUBLIC-HOUSE APPEAL
A special sitting took place at the Crown Court County Hall, Warwick, to-day; when Mr. J. S. Statford Dugdale, Q. C. presided, and there were also present Mr. W. P. Dickins (vice-chairman) and Colonel Caldicott. The greater part of the day was occupied in the hearing of a licensing appeal by Richard Birch Daykin, tenant of the “Kings Head” (full license), Dudley Street, Birmingham, against the refusal of the Birmingham licensing magistrates to renew the license. Mr. Alfred Young and Mr. Hugo Young were for the appellant, and Mr. Russell Griffiths and Mrs. Smith Dorsett for the respondent magistrates. There was a conviction against the house for betting, when the license was held by a man named George Baker. The house was also objected to on the ground that it was a disorderly one, and not required. Mr. A. Young raised a legal point. He contended that the appeal could not be heard because Deakin had not been served with a notice of the grounds of objection seven days before the annual licensing day. Mr. Griffiths contended that notice of objection was waived by the appearance of the appellant. The court upheld the objection on the ground that the notice of objection was not valid, and dismissed the appeal, but stated a case for a higher court”…

The effect that this dismissal had on Richard Birch, both personally and financially and also his family became apparent over the coming months. It was rumoured that Sarah Ann Daykin (nee Bonsall) was notorious for her foul temper and extravagant lifestyle. She was alleged to drag her daughter round by her hair and beat the children in her fits of temper, yet appear to be the model lady driving around in her pony and trap dressed in the finest of clothes, thinking nothing of spending a fortune on a ball gown and eating only the best quality foods and meats. Her husband Richard Birch Daykin was a drunkard by all accounts although it is not known if this was the reason for Sarah’s tempers or Sarah’s tempers being the cause of Richard’s drinking.

Richard Birch’s excess of drinking reached its climax when he was charged with drunkenness in his own pub. The story of his offence was printed in the “Birmingham Daily Post” on Thursday the 3rd of May 1894…

“A LANDLORD CHARGED WITH DRUNKENNESS”;- Richard Birch Daykin, of the King’s Head Hotel, Dudley Street, was charged with being drunk on his licensed premises.- On the evening of the 26th April Superintendent Stephenson saw him in his own house under the influence of drink.- A bailiff who was on the premises said defendant had threatened to throw him out.- Dr. Haddow was called, and said he did not think the defendant was drunk at the time. – A fine of 10s. and costs was imposed”…

Richard Birch Daykin’s troubles reached a critical point a month or so following his conviction for drunkenness when he filed for bankruptcy in June 1894. Maybe the reason for his overindulgence in alcohol was due to his financial problems, or visa-versa, and that the cause of his downfall was due to his intake of alcohol, although this is just pure conjecture, but whatever the reason, according to “The London Gazette” dated June 1st 1894… “Daykin, Richard Birch, lately residing at The Roebuck Inn, Soho Hill, Birmingham Warwickshire, now the Kings Head Inn, Dudley Street, Birmingham aforesaid, Licensed Victualer, Date of filing May 28th 1894, Birmingham Court, Debtors Petition”...

The “Huddersfield Chronicle” had details of recent bankruptcy’s in its edition on Saturday 2nd June 1894… “The Bankruptcy Acts 1883 & 1890.- Receiving Orders (By Telegraph from last night’s London Gazette.)

… “Richard Birch Daykin, lately residing Roebuck Inn, Soho Hill, now King’s Head Inn, Dudley Street, both Birmingham, licensed victualer”…

The “Birmingham Daily Post” on Thursday 7th June 1894 also carried the story… “In the Birmingham Court of Bankruptcy yesterday, Richard Birch Daykin, the King’s Head, Dudley Street, Birmingham, licensed victualer, was adjudicated a bankrupt by Mr. Deputy-Registrar Parry”…

In “The London Gazette dated June 8th 1894 the date of the first meeting at Birmingham Court, 23 Colmore Row, was given as June 21st 1894 at 2.30 pm. and the date of the Public Examination at Birmingham County Court was July 5th 1894 at 2.00pm…

The “Birmingham Daily Post” on Thursday 5th July 1894 also followed the story... “APPOINTMENT IN BANKRUPTCY- This Day.- Before Mr. Registrar Parry……and Richard Birch Daykin; Public examinations. At two o’clock”…

Despite Richard Birch Daykin’s bankruptcy proceedings he still continued with his appeal against his licence refusal for the King’s Head as reported the “Coventry Evening Telegraph” on Wednesday 11th July 1894…

“A BIRMINGHAM LICENSING APPEAL.- The Master of the Rolls and Lords Justices Kay and Smith had before them yesterday an appeal by the plaintiffs in a Birmingham licensing case of Richard Birch Daykin (licensee) and Atkinsons, Limited (owners), v. E. L. Parker. The appeal was from a judgment of Justices Charles and Bruce, sitting as a Divisional Court of Queen’s Bench, and reversing an order of Quarter Sessions, which had granted an appeal from a decision of the local magistrates not to renew the license of the King’s Head Inn, Dudley Street, Birmingham. Mr. Alexander Young appeared for the appellant licensee and brewers, and Mr. Poland represented the respondents, but was not called upon. The Master of the Rolls, in giving judgment, said that an Act which had been quoted did not alter one previously referred to in regard to the point at issue. This was that the Licensing Justices might, notwithstanding that no notice had been given the applicant for the renewal of a licence, on objection being made adjourn the granting of the license to a future day, and require the attendance of the holder of the license on such day. For reasons given by Justice Charles – although he did not agree with all latter said in his judgment – he thought the appeal must be dismissed, and the decision of the magistrates affirmed. Lords Justices Kay and Smith concurred, and the appeal was dismissed accordingly”…

A fortnight after losing this appeal Richard Birch Daykin’s bankruptcy hearing was continuing, as reported in the “Birmingham Daily Post” on Friday the 27th July 1894… “APPOINTMENTS IN BANKRUPTCY, This Day.- Before Mr. Registrar Parry. Re Alfred Bevan; Adjourned public examination, at two o’clock.- Before Mr. Registrar Glaisyer. Re George Lowe: Public examination. Re William Watts, Thomas Chance, Stephen Davies, Richard Birch Daykin: Adjourned public examinations at eleven o’clock”…

Richard Birch Daykin had continued to pursue his appeal against the Birmingham Licensing Magistrates, originally contemplating taking his case to the highest authority in the country, the House of Lords, but according to the “Coventry Evening Telegraph” the following year on Tuesday 12th February 1895, that referred to the licensing problems experienced by him at “King’s Head”… “It will be remembered that some time back the Birmingham magistrates quashed the license of the King’s Head, Dudley Street, granted to Richard Birch Daykin, on the ground that the house had been used as a betting house. On appeal, the Warwickshire Quarter Sessions quashed the magisterial decision, which, however, was upheld by the Higher Court and the Court of Appeal. As a last resort the appellant decided to go to the House of Lords, Yesterday morning however, Mr. Barradale (magistrate’s clerk, Birmingham) received notice, that the appeal had been abandoned, and that the King’s Head was now closed”…

Following the closure of the “King’s Head” in Birmingham Richard Birch Daykin must have been discharged from his bankruptcy as he took over the tenancy of the “Globe Hotel” in Rugeley, although the actual date is unknown. However, he still managed to attract the attention of the press, although not on this occasion for his own notoriety according to an article in the “Manchester Courier and Lancashire General Advertiser” on the 22nd October 1896, in a report from the Preston Quarter Sessions, under the heading of “Pleaded Guilty”… “James William Daykin, 19, a respectably-dressed young man,robbing his father, Richard B. Daykin, of a watch, chain, several coins, and two bracelets, at Blackpool, on September 29th. It was stated for the father that he acted hastily in causing his son to be arrested, and now wished him to be dealt with under the First Offenders Act. The son was also said to have pledged the things in order to pay his railway fare to Birmingham, intending, when he got work, to redeem and return them. The father became surety in £100 for his son’s good behavior”…

The reason for the family visit to Blackpool was probably for the wedding of Richard Birch and Sarah’s fourth eldest daughter Lissie (Elizabeth Eleanor), who married Frank Harris in the September quarter 1896 at the Holy Trinity Church, South Shore, Blackpool.

Richard Birch Daykin finally succumbed to the ravages of alcohol, dying of sclerosis of the liver on 6th April 1899, aged just 48 years at “The Globe Hotel”, Rugeley, in the presence of his son Thomas (Bailey) Daykin, his occupation being listed on the death certificate as “Licensed Victualer”.

Richard Birch was buried on 10th April 1899 in grave 615 section 6 at Wolseley Road Cemetery, Rugeley. There was an entry in the “Lichfield Mercury” in the “Births, Marriages and Deaths” section on Friday 21st April 1899… “DAYKIN.- On the 6th inst., at the Globe Hotel, Rugeley, Richard Birch Daykin, aged 48 years”…

According to the “National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administration)”… “DAYKIN Richard Birch of the “Globe” Inn Rugeley Staffordshire died 6 April 1899 Probate Lichfield 10 May to Sarah Ann Daykin widow Effects £18.”…

Following Richard Birch Daykin’s death, his widow Sarah and sons, Henry, Cecil and Septimus went to live at 63 Woodland Road, Handsworth, where they are recorded in the 1901 Census on the 31st March in the Parish of St. James. The head of household was now Sarah A. Daykin, aged 60, with her profession listed as a “Housekeeper” and being born in Clay Cross Derbyshire. Her sons; Henry F. aged 29, Cecil C. aged 25, and Septimus C. aged 21 were all listed as “Shop Assistants” by profession and all  born in Ilkeston, although exactly which shops they were all assistants in is unknown.

By the following year, 1902, Sarah Ann Daykin had moved back to Henley-in-Arden, the place of her birth, and taken over as licensee of the “Bell” public house, as recorded in “Kelly’s Directory of Warwickshire”… “Daykin Sarah Ann (Mrs.), Bell P.H. 93 High Street Henley-in-Arden”…

It wasn’t long however before her name began to appear in the local press. The “Leamington Spa Courier” – Friday 31 January 1902… “NO NAME ON COLLAR.- Sarah Ann Daykin, of Henley-in-Arden, licensed victualler, was summoned for allowing a dog to be on the highway, at Henley-in-Arden, without a name on collar, on the 9th January.- Fined 5s. including costs.- P.C. Moore, who proved the case, said the dog had a collar but no name on it”…

The “Leamington Spa Courier” – Friday 13 November 1903… “PERMITTING DRUNKENNESS.- Sarah Ann Daykin, of Henley-in-Arden, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on her licensed premises the Bell Inn, Henley-in-Arden, on September 30th.- Defendant pleaded not guilty.- P.S. Bastock and P.C. Moore stated that a woman named Horsley left the premises on the night named in a state of intoxication and at the following Petty Sessions, was convicted for the offence.- Defendant now denied that the woman Horsley got drunk on her premises, and alleged that she attended her as her nurse. Defendant was several times called to order by the Bench, and was threatened with removal from the Court during the hearing of the case.- The Bench after hearing the evidence, fined defendant £5 and costs 6s. 6d.”…

It is not known exactly how long Sarah Ann Daykin remained as licensee of the Bell Inn at Henley-in-Arden as an application for a transfer of licence was made in 1903… the “Leamington Spa Courier” – Friday 27 November 1903… “APPLICATION FOR TEMPORARY TRANSFER.- Mr. Robinson applied for a temporary transfer of the Bell Inn, Henley-in-Arden, from Mrs. Daykin, but as Mrs. Daykin was not represented, the Bench adjourned the application till next Petty Sessions”…

The “Leamington Spa Courier” – Friday 18 December 1903… “TRANSFERS.- A temporary transfer of the Bell Inn, Henley-in-Arden, was granted from Mrs. Daykin to Mr. Robinson”…

By the time of the 1911 Census on the 3rd April, Richard Birch Daykin’s widow, Sarah Ann Daykin (nee Bonsall) was living alone in a one bed roomed house at 5 Park Avenue, Suffrage Street, Smethwick, her three sons having married in the intervening years since the last census. She was listed as Head, aged 61, a widow who had borne eleven children, two of which were now dead, leaving nine still alive, and had herself been born at Clay Cross, Derbyshire.

Sarah Ann Daykin (nee Bonsall) died on the 25th March 1921 of Influenza & Bronchitis at 1 Western Road, Birmingham although she is listed as “of 1 Abbey Street, Birmingham, Widow of Richard Birch Daykin, Hotel Proprietor”, and the death was informed by E. Harris, daughter, of 45 Soho Hill on the 26th March 1921. The “E” Harris is Lissie (Elizabeth Eleanor) Daykin who had married Frank Harris in the September quarter 1896. There is no mention as to where the body of Sarah Ann Daykin was laid to rest.

John Daykin goes on to consider the histories of the children of Richard and Sarah Anne Daykin. These can be found elsewhere on the site.

We are now ready to continue our walk along the west side of South Street.