Place names in Victorian Ilkeston

Albert Villas … a terrace of 14 houses, on the south side of Station Road, between the River Erewash and the Ropewalk
Albion Cottages …  a few houses on the east side of Wilton Street
Albion Terrace … a row of half a dozen houses on the south side of Northgate Street (Bath Street end)
Babbington’s Cottage … down Station Road, with a frontage to the north side of that road and to the Erewash Canal. It adjoined the Day Gore Close, an area of land used as a coal wharf up to the late nineteenth century when it was acquired as building land.
Belvoir Street … connects Granby Street and Lower Bloomsgrove Road. Walking from the Granby Street end you would pass William Street, then Tutin Street, and finally Cambridge Cottages
Boot Lane … a former name for Stanton Road. Named after a properous family which lived there
Bottom Road … the eastern part of what is now Awsworth Road, as it approaches the Erewash Canal
Brewery Row … off Bottom Road, later Awsworth Road. A group of houses by the Erewash Canal and the Jolly Boatman Inn
Cambridge Cottages … a group of six houses off the north side of Belvoir Street
Carrier’s Buildings … see Pleasant Place
Clarence Street … for a very short time, the former name of Rupert Street
Commercial Terrace … a row of houses off the north side of Awsworth Road, almost directly opposite Springfield Gardens
Common Gardens … off Duke Street
Earl Place … a small yard off the east side of Bath Street, south of the Mundy Arms, just between Talbot Place and Rutland Street
Evans Cottages … housing at the pottery works of Richard Evans. Also referred to as the Pottery. Not connected with Evans Row at Nottingham Road (later White Lion Square).
Evans Shops … workshops and worker’s houses of employees of Richard Evans at the Pottery. Not connected with Evans Row at White Lion Square
Ferns Hollow … premises on the south side of Station Road, between Rupert Street and the Erewash Canal
Fletcher Place … on the west side of Bath Street, directly opposite the Queen’s Head Inn. Where Wilko Store now stands. Named after Samuel Fletcher, lace manufacturer, who later moved into Wood Street.
Hais or Hays Lane … off the east side of Market Street, close to the site of the old Hallcroft School. Just south of St Mary’s churchyard
Harefields … home to the Thompson family, late Victorian. In Derby Road, close to present-day Kniveton Park
May Street … a new street, proposed in 1893, at the bottom of Station Road but not built
Millfield House … another name for the Park home of the Potter family. At the end of Park Road, once known as Millfield Lane
Mount Row … a group of four cottages to the north of Club Row, and like Club Row, set back from Bath Street. Not to be confused with Mount Street which lay to the south of Club Row.
Pleasant Place … a group of four houses off the west side of South Street, built by William Carrier in 1857, and later known as Queen’s Terrace. The jitty still exists but not the houses
Pledge Street … off the east side of South Street. Laid out in the early 1860s when this name was used for a very brief period. Renamed Gladstone Street in the later 1860s, perhaps as a result of Liberal politician William Gladstone becoming Prime Minister for the first time, in 1868. Ilkeston’s Local Board was dominated by Liberals.
Queen’s Terrace … see Pleasant Place
Revill’s Yard … at the top of Bath Street, on its west side. Also known as Bath Street Terrace, and previously as White’s Yard.
Spring Villas … a small terrace on the west side of Market Street close to its junction with Gladstone Street
Station Cottages … a group of houses in Brussels Terrace
Talbot Place … a small yard off the east side of Bath Street, between the Mundy Arms and Earl Place
Tutin Street … off the north side of Belvoir Street
Wheatley Row … a group of 13 houses off the north side of Pimlico; they stood on the east side of what is now the Croft Yard Reservoir and were part of the estate of builder/mason John Wilson Wheatley (1836-1896)
West View … four-bedroomed house at 18 Granby Street (south side, on the corner with Lower Granby Street). Once home to the Weatherhog family.
White Lion Square … that part of Nottingham Road from the White Lion Inn to South Street, renamed by the Council as White Lion Square in 1889
Wide Yard … a cul-de-sac yard off the west side of South Street. Later renamed West Street when it was extended into Albert Street
William Street … off the north side of Belvoir Street
York Street … a new street, proposed in 1893, at the bottom of Station Road but not built