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The Higgetts (by John Daykin)

Pausing at Mount Street ….

Richard and Ann Daykin (nee Clemerson) had a third daughter on the 6th April 1833, who was also named Elizabeth, baptised on the 25th of June 1837 at the Wesleyan Methodist Church Ilkeston. There are further records of a christening of Elizabeth Daykin on the 27th April 1833 (born to Richard Daykin & Ann Clemerson) at Salem Chapel Barker Gate-Armenian Methodist, Nottingham, one of the independent chapels set up in those days of nonconformity.

Elizabeth married tailor and draper Elijah Higgitt in the June quarter of 1855. Elijah had been born in Shipley, Derbyshire on the 22nd of October 1833 and baptised at the Independent, Ilkeston on the 25th of November 1833, the youngest child of Henry and Ann Higgit (nee Shelton).

Elijah Higgitt’s parents, coal wharf labourer Henry Higgit and Ann Shelton had been married on the 3rd of October 1818 at St. Mary’s in Ilkeston. Ann Shelton was the daughter of Thomas and Ann Shelton and had been christened in Melbourne, Derbyshire on the 20th of September 1789 and Henry Higgit was the son of Henry (Snr.) and Catherine Higgit (nee Critchlow) and had been christened on the 13th November 1796 at St. Mary’s in Ilkeston according to the church transcripts.

Henry Higgit (Snr.)  (c.1760 –  23rd May 1848) had married Catherine Critchlow (1765 –  2nd July 1853) according to the All Saints, Kirk Hallam Transcripts on the 11th January 1788… “HIGGETT. Henry of Heanor (Coalminer) = CRITCHLOW. Catherine of this parish. Catherine Critchlow had been baptised at All Saints, Kirk Hallam on the 31st of March 1765 to William and Sarah Critchlow (nee Derbyshire), one of several children known to have been born to this couple, who themselves had been married at All Saints, Kirk Hallam on the 7th of March 1758… “CRITCHLOW. William (weaver) = DERBYSHIRE. Sarah, both of this parish”…

Three other children’s baptisms have been recorded in the All Saints, Kirk Hallam transcripts attributed to William and Sarah Critchlow (nee Derbyshire);
… “1758 Aug. 5. CRITCHLOW. John of William and Sarah”…
… “1760 Mar. 1. CRITCHLOW. Nanny of William and Sarah”…
… “1767 Oct. 22. CRITCHLOW. Thomas of William and Sarah”…
and one death;
… “1773 Oct. 19. CRITCHLOW. Thomas of William buried”…

There are two further children apart from Henry (Jnr.) recorded in the Ilkeston St. Mary’s church transcripts to “Henry and Cath Higgitt”; Nanny Higgitt baptised on the 7th of September 1788 and Will Higgitt, baptised on the 23rd of October 1791. Nanny (or Ann) Higgit married collier Henry Hunt but sadly died in 1830 aged just 41 years and was buried in St. Mary’s Ilkeston along with her parents.

There is an inscription on the grave of Henry and Catherine Higgit (nee Critchlow) in St. Mary’s churchyard in Ilkeston;-

”HIGGITT – Erected in memory of Henry Higgitt of Ilkeston Common who departed this life on the 23rd of May 1848 aged 88 years also in memory of Catherine Higgit wife of the above who died 2nd July 1853 aged LXXXVIII years”

There is also an inscription on the grave of one of Henry and Catherine’s children, Ann, who was known as “Nanny”;-

… “HUNT (and HIGGIT) – To the memory of Ann Hunt the wife of Henry Hunt and daughter of Henry and Catherine Higgit who died June 16th 1830 in the 41st year of her age. Weep not for me my parents dear nor children whom I have left therefore prepare to follow me that you may all be blest”

Henry (Jnr.) and Ann Higgit (nee Shelton) are known to have had seven other children apart from Elijah;

— Catherine, baptised on the 18th of September 1819 at St. Mary’s Ilkeston

— Samuel, baptised on the 3rd of August 1821, also at St. Mary’s but who sadly never survived infancy and was buried in the same churchyard on the 15th of January 1822 age just seven months

— Henry Higgitt, born on the 25th December 1822 who was christened on the 27th December 1822 at the Wesleyan Methodist Church Ilkeston, but only survived for three weeks, being buried on the 20th January 1823 at St. Mary’s

— John, baptised on the 25th of January at St. Mary’s, who also died before reaching adulthood and was buried on the 10th of March 1838 age 14 in the same churchyard

— Ann, who was baptised on the 14th of February at St. Mary’s, who went on to marry grocer John Gilliat on the 30th of April 1867. At their wedding, John, from Nottingham was recorded as being the son of linseed cake manufacturer Francis Gilliat, witnessed by Elijah and Elizabeth Higgitt, with Ann being described as the daughter of Henry “gentleman”

— The seventh child, Sarah Higgit was born on the 7th of March 1829 and christened on the 1st April 1829 at the Independent Church, Ilkeston and also died before reaching maturity, age 10, and was buried on the 3rd of January 1830 in St. Mary’s, Ilkeston;

— And finally Hannah Higgitt, born on the 14th of December 1830 and christened on the 29th of June 1837 in the Wesleyan Methodist Church, Ilkeston.

The first two children (Catherine and Samuel) are both referred to as… “to Henry and Ann of Cotmanhay”.. but the remaining family members are always referred to… “Henry and Ann of Shipley”…; so presumably they moved the short distance from Cotmanhay to Shipley sometime during 1822.

Henry Higgit’s (Jnr.) wife, Ann Higgit (nee Shelton) died on the 19th August 1837 and was buried on the 22nd at St. Mary’s, Ilkeston but Henry (Jnr.) was remarried on the 11th March 1849 to Ann Chadwick, the widow of Samuel Chadwick who had died in October 1833 aged just 36 years. The wedding at Ilkeston St. Mary’s was witnessed by William and Kezia Hunt, when… “Henry Higgitt, labourer, the son of Henry (deceased) a collier, married Ann Chadwick, the daughter of Samuel Noon, a framesmith”…

Ann Chadwick (nee Noon) had been baptised in Ilkeston on the 6th May 1798 at Ilkeston St. Mary’s … “Ann of Samuel and Ann”… and died on February 27th 1865.

It is interesting to note that Charles Chadwick, fruiterer, greengrocer, potato merchant, confectioner and dealer in British wines, traded in Bath Street, in premises owned by next-door neighbour Elijah Higgitt in Bath Street, until his death in December 1879. It was Charles Chadwick’s mother Ann who married Elijah’s father, Henry.

The first census to show Elijah Higgitt, his wife Elizabeth and their family was in 1861 for Bath Street, Ilkeston, where Elijah Higgitt was Head, aged 27, a Tailor and Housekeeper , Elizabeth, his wife aged 28, a Dressmaker and their two sons; Richard Henry, aged 3, a Scholar who had been born in September quarter 1857 and Arthur William, aged 1 who had been born in December quarter 1859. There were also two servants; Frederick Green aged 18, a Tailor and Hairdresser and Hannah Barlow, aged 15, a House Servant, all born in Ilkeston.

Elijah and Elizabeth had a third son, Elijah Cecil, born in the June quarter of 1862 who only survived for fourteen weeks and died on July 31st 1862.

The 1871 Census transcript wasn’t very detailed and showed only Elijah and Elizabeth Higgett, both aged 37 living at Bath Street.

Elijah Higgitt was mentioned in a newspaper article in the “Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald” on Saturday 19th February 1876 when he was a member of the jury in a crime that shocked Ilkeston… “SHOCKING CHILD MURDER AT ILKESTON. A shocking affair has just been brought to light here. A man named Alonza Spencer was looking into a pig-stye of Mr. H. Tatham on Friday last, when he was horrified to find the body of a female child in an old tin wrapped in some old clothes”… The inquest was held on Saturday afternoon, and the following gentlemen constituted the jury:- Messrs…. E. Higgitt…

In March 1878, after 22 years in the drapery business, Elijah opened a new shop, next door to the old one. Now he was at number 9 Bath Street, where he built a prosperous business, going to any length to protect his interests, as documented in an article printed in the “Derbyshire daily Telegraph” on Friday the 7th November 1879 concerning Elijah Higgitt…

“ILKESTON COUNTY COURT -Thursday – (Before Mr. W. F. Woodforde, Judge)  ELIJAH HIGGIT  V  THOMAS MANNERS – Plaintiff, a draper and clothier at Ilkeston, claimed £8 odd for goods supplied to defendants wife – Mrs. Manners who said she was trading on her own behalf, and in partnership with a Mrs. Sharp at the time the goods were supplied. Her husband had nothing to do with the business.- Plaintiff called Mrs. Sharp, who said that she was only in partnership with Mrs. Manners in the dressmaking business, and had nothing to do with the shop goods. – Mrs. Manners, however, produced a bill in which the plaintiff had entered the names of both parties, and received money thereon. His Honour said it was evident that Mrs. Manners had been trading on her own account, in partnership with Mrs. Sharp, as proved by the bills produced. He could not therefore hold the husband liable – Judgment for the defendant”…

The 1881 Census showed the Higgitt still residing at Bath Street, with Elijah Higgett now aged 47, a tailor and draper who employed 4 men, 1 girl and 1 boy, and was born in Shipley Derbyshire. Elizabeth was the same age, 47, with no professional status given but the children were now adults; Richard H. aged 23 and Arthur W. aged 21, a School master, and all were born in Ilkeston.

Elijah was also becoming a member of Ilkeston’s civic society, with an example being printed in the “Nottingham Evening Post” on Friday April 1st 1881… “OVERSEERS FOR ILKESTON TOWNSHIP.- At a meeting held in the Boys’ School room, Ilkeston, yesterday afternoon, Mr. A. Aldred, sen., presiding, the following were nominated as overseers for the township, from which list the magistrates at Heanor, on Monday, will appoint two overseers:-… E. Higgitt”

Elijah’s business was also continuing to attract many miscreants with numerous reports over the years surrounding theft and dishonest dealings from his shop;-

… “Derby Mercury” – Wednesday 3 May 1882… “LARCENY AT ILKESTON.- George Cullins, alias John Mills (37), collier, admitted stealing a pair of trousers the property of Elijah Higgitt, at Ilkeston, on April 8th, and was sentenced to nine months hard labour”… according to the “Leicester Chronicle” on Saturday 6 May 1882, which also carried the same story, but with an addendum of … “having been previously convicted”

… “Sheffield Daily Telegraph” – Friday 26 May 1882… “ILKESTON POLICE COURT.- At the Ilkeston Petty Sessions yesterday Silas Scattergood was charged with obtaining a coat by means of false pretence from the shop of Mr. Elijah Higgitt, clothier, Ilkeston, on May 17.- prisoner was committed for trial at the Quarter Sessions”...

… “Sheffield Independent”- Friday 26 May 1882… “AN IMPUDENT SWINDLE.- Silas Scattergood was charged at Ilkeston, yesterday, with obtaining under false pretence a coat, from the shop of Mr. E. Higgitt, clothier, Ilkeston, on May 17. It appears that prisoner, who has an uncle a farmer at West Hallam, went to Mr. Higgitt’s shop on the day in question, and said his uncle had authorised him to be measured for a suit of clothes. This was done, and he also took a ready-made coat, saying his uncle would pay for it. He subsequently returned for a pair of trousers, but could not get any to suit him. The coat was pawned on the next day by a companion of the prisoner’s. On Mr. Higgitt seeing prisoners uncle, he was told that prisoner had no authority to purchase anything in his name, and he was accordingly arrested on a charge of false pretences.- prisoner was committed to take his trial at the next Derby assizes”…

 “Derby Mercury” – Wednesday 31 May 1882… “OBTAINING GOODS UNDER FALSE PRETENCES.- Silas Scattergood, a respectable-looking young man, was charged with this offence at Ilkeston on May 17th.- Richard H. Higgitt, manager to Mr. Higgitt, clothier, Bath-street, Ilkeston, deposed that prisoner came to their shop about ten o’clock on the morning of May 17, and said that his uncle, Mr. Thomas Trueman, of West Hallam, had sent him to be measured for a suit of clothes. Witness measured him, and was then told that he was to take a ready-made coat, which his uncle would pay for. In consequence of this representation witness let prisoner have the coat produced. About five o’clock in the afternoon the prisoner again came to the shop, and asked for a pair of trousers, but as they had not a pair like the coat he went away.- Jas. H. Orchard said that on the same day he met prisoner in Station-road, and was asked by him if he would purchase a coat, which he declined to do. Ultimately witness consented to pledge it for prisoner, and did so the same night at Mr. Weatherhogg’s, pawnbroker, for 8s. 6d. – Thomas Trueman, farmer and innkeeper, West Hallam, deposed that prisoner was his nephew, and came to his house on Tuesday, May 16. Witness was asked if he would assist him, and he gave prisoner some coppers he had. The prisoner had no settled home, as his father was dead. He did not authorise him to get a suit of clothes at Mr. Higgitt’s, nor tell him that he would pay for them; although about two years ago he did authorise him to get some clothing in his name.- Police-constable Downing said he apprehended prisoner at Mr. Bamford’s beerhouse about eight o’clock on the evening of May 17, and charged him with obtaining a coat by false pretences, when he replied that his uncle had told him to get what he wanted. He received the coat the coat from Mr. Weatherhogg’s the next day.- Prisoner pleaded guilty, and was committed for trial at the next Quarter Sessions.- A further charge of obtaining goods to the value of 5/-., under false pretences, from Mr. Sutton, clothier, Bath-street, was not proceeded with”…

There was also an article in the “Derby Daily Telegraph” on Saturday 11 October 1884 concerning payment of recompense from the council to Elijah Higgitt… “LOCAL BOARD – On Tuesday night a meeting of the Board was held in the Town Hall… The question of compensation for some alterations at the bottom of Mount-street was discussed. The Board eventually agreed to offer Mr. Higgitt £25 to put his premises in a line with the adjoining building”

Elijah and Elizabeth’s youngest son, Arthur William Higgitt married Mary Jane Philpott at All Saints Church, Rotherhithe on December 22nd 1883. Arthur was described as a 24 year-old bachelor, school master, living at 107 Railton Road, Brixton, son of Elijah, draper. Mary, who was born in Rotherhithe in the June quarter 1857, was a 26 year-old spinster, living at 22 New Road, the daughter of William Philpott, Mariner.

Elijah and Elizabeth’s eldest son, Richard Henry Higgitt married Maud Beatrice Widdowson, in the December quarter of 1884. Maud had been born in Kimberley, Notts in the June quarter of 1865.

On May 25th 1885, Elijah’s wife Elizabeth Higgitt (nee Daykin) died aged just 52 years and several reports of her death were printed in various newspapers.

The “Derby Daily Telegraph” – Thursday 28 May 1885… “ILKESTON – SUDDEN DEATH OF A TRADESMAN’S WIFE.- On Tuesday, the wife of Mr. Elijah Higgitt, draper and clothier, Ilkeston, died suddenly. The deceased, who was about 55 years of age, had been unwell for a day or two, but only kept her bed on Monday. She intended getting up on Tuesday, but expired suddenly during the night, presumably of heart disease”…

“Nottinghamshire Guardian” – Friday 29 May 1885 and also the Derbyshire Times and Chesterfield Herald – Saturday 30 May 1885… “SUDDEN DEATH AT ILKESTON.- On Tuesday morning, Mrs. Higgitt, the wife of Mr. Higgitt, tailor and draper, of Ilkeston, was found dead in bed. On Wednesday last, the deceased caught cold, and was so unwell on Monday that Dr. Wood was called in to attend her. On the following morning she was found dead in bed about seven o’clock. The cause of death is inflammation”…

“Derby Mercury” – Wednesday 3 June 1885… “SUDDEN DEATH .- About seven o’clock on Tuesday, the wife of Mr. Elijah Higgitt, tailor and draper, Bath-street, was found dead in bed. Deceased caught a cold last Wednesday, and was so unwell on Monday, that Dr. Wood was called in. The cause of death in inflammation. Mrs. Higgitt was highly respected in the town, and was a member of the Independent Church”...

Two years after the death of Elijah’s wife Elizabeth (nee Daykin) in April 1887 at the General Baptist Chapel in Loughborough Elijah remarried Mary Ann Clemerson, daughter of Loughborough brazier and iron monger Henry and Betsy Clemenson (nee Riste), who was the cousin of his first wife Elizabeth Daykin who had been born in the September quarter of 1850.

Henry Clemenson was the brother of Anne Clemenson who married Richard Daykin in 1829 – Elizabeth Daykin’s parents. Henry Clemenson had married Betsey Riste in the March quarter of 1850 at Loughborough  and had two known children, Mary Ann and Henry (Jnr.) born March quarter of 1852.

Henry Clemenson (Snr.) died in the December quarter of 1864, leaving his widowed wife Betsy and two children, as his daughter, Mary Ann Clemenson appears on the 1861 census as a ten year old daughter, then on the 1871 census for Loughborough along with her mother and brother; Betsy Clemerson, 43, born Sutton, Notts; Mary Ann, 20; Henry, 19; both born Loughborough; Mary Ann Carruthers, servant, 15, born Long Whatton, L’stershire. In the 1881 census the family live at 2 Mill Street, Loughborough, with Mary A. Clemerson shown as aged 30, born 1851 in Loughborough, now a furniture dealer by trade, living along with her mother, Betsy, aged 53, born Sutton Bonnington, Notts. and a servant, Martha E. Grimbley, aged 20, born in Ardwick Green, Lancaster. Mary’s brother, Henry Clemenson (Jnr.) lived next door at number 1 Mill Street with his wife Sarah E. and their two children, James H. and Arthur B. Clemenson. Henry (Jnr.) is also a furniture dealer employing two men and twelve boys.

In the late 1800’s, following his remarriage, Elijah and Mary Ann Higgitt (nee Clemerson) moved into Charnwood House in St. Mary’s Street, just around the corner from Gregory Street, where Elijah’s two sons lived with their families. Richard Henry Higgit, the elder brother was his father’s assistant at Arden Villas, and Arthur William Higgitt.

Elijah Higgitt continued to be a notable businessman in Ilkeston as well as becoming a renowned religious figure, but still suffered with petty larceny at his premises.

“The Derby Daily Telegraph” – Saturday 30 July 1887… “ILKESTON.- BUILDING SOCIETY.- The thirty-fourth annual meeting of the shareholders of the Ilkeston Permanent Benefit Building Society was held in the Town Hall, Ilkeston, on Thursday evening. Mr. E. Higgitt in the chair.- The annual report stated that the subscriptions for 1886 were £1,990 12s. 8d. and the redeemed mortgages £1,650 2s. 9d. Fresh mortgages to the amount of £1,380 had been advanced, and the withdrawals and interest amounted to £1,778 3s. 8d. The balance in bank was £1,835 2s. 6d. The retiring directors were Messrs. E. Higgitt, H. F. Daykin and R. B. Daykin, and they were all re-elected. Mr. J. Cope was appointed shareholder’s auditor”…

“The Derby Mercury” – Wednesday 2 January 1889.- … “ILKESTON. ALLEGED FELONY.- On Thursday Elizabeth Smith, a young married woman, with a ten month baby in her arms, was charged with stealing 3½ yards of plush, the property of William E. Craddock, draper, Ilkeston. She was also charged with stealing a boys’ overcoat, the property of Elijah Higgitt, clothier, Ball-street, Ilkeston, in December. In each case the article was missed, and it was found that prisoner had pledged it at Mr. Moor’s pawnbroker, Ilkeston – She was committed  for trial on both charges at the next Quarter sessions”…

“Derby Daily Telegraph” – Thursday 24 April 1890. … “DERBYSHIRE CONGREGATIONAL UNION. – ANNUAL MEETING AT GLOSSOP.- The annual conference of the Derbyshire Congregational Union was resumed on Wednesday morning at the Littlemoor Church, Glossop. At a quarter past nine a devotional service was held, and at ten the business of the Conference was proceeded with…the delegates present included representatives of the following churches… Ilkeston : Rev. John Fleming, Mr. E. Higgitt”…

At some point in the late 1890’s Elijah and his second wife, Mary Ann Higgitt (nee Clemerson) moved to live in Loughborough, living close to the home of William Armstrong – who was previously married to Mary Ann’s aunt, Harriet Clemerson.

Elijah was still busy with his services to the church, being mention over the coming years in various newspapers attending and officiating at a variety of functions.

…“Leicester Chronicle” – Saturday 15 February 1896.- … “METHODIST FREE CHURCH.- On Wednesday afternoon last week, the Rev. T. J. Dickinson, of Nottingham, preached an able sermon in the above place. A tea was provided at five o’clock, to which a goodly number sat down. In the evening Mr. Dickinson delivered his popular lecture entitled “Rowland Hill, the eccentric preacher”. Rev. J. Seddon (pastor) moved a hearty vote of thanks to the lecturer. Mr. E. Higgitt took the chair. The net proceeds were £3 3.”…

…“Leicester Chronicle” – Saturday 2 April 1898. – … “On Sunday last an effort was made to make the P.S.A. services more attractive than usual, with the result that in the afternoon the Temperance Hall was full, and at night literally crammed….Altogether the service passed off well, the success being largely due to Mr. E. Higgitt, the energetic secretary”…

…“Leicester Chronicle” – Saturday 9 April 1898. – … “P.S.A. BOOK DISTRIBUTION.- The quarterly distribution of books to the members of the Pleasant Sunday Afternoon Class was carried out at the class meeting…and Mr. E. Higgitt, honorary secretary, distributed the books”...

…“Leicester Chronicle” – Saturday 7 April 1900.- … “BAND OF HOPE.- On Monday evening last a Band of Hope festival was held in the Temperance Hall…Mr. E. Higgitt officiated as chairman”…

…“Leicester Chronicle” – Saturday 1 September 1900. -… “WESLEYAN CHAPEL. On Wednesday special services were held at the Wesleyan Chapel, in continuation of the re-opening of the new schools…The chair was occupied in             the evening by Mr. E. Higgitt”…

…“Derby Daily Telegraph” – Wednesday 24 October 1900.- … “CONGREGATIONAL BAZAAR.- A three days’ bazaar, organised for the purpose of raising a substantial sum towards the £3,000 required before commencing the erection of a new Independent Church at Ilkeston…At the opening ceremony there was a numerous attendance, including… Me. E. and Mrs. Higgitt”…

Elijah and Mary Ann are both shown on the 1901 Census living at the Old Rectory, Long Whatton; Elijah Higgitt, age 67, living on his own means, born Shipley, Derbyshire; Mary A. Higgitt, wife, age 50, born L’borough, along with two servants; Sarah A. Marshall, 39, Housemaid Domestic, and Edith Platts, 25, General servant, domestic.

Despite now being in his 70’s, Elijah was still active in his pursuit for temperance, as reported in the “Nottingham Evening Post” – Wednesday 24 October 1906… “LIQUOR LICENCE AGAIN… “At the Loughborough Petty Sessions to-day, Mr. R. S. Clifford applied for a six days’ temporary licence for Mr. L. Watkins to sell intoxicating liquors on premises occupied by the Brush Electrical Engineering Works. Mr. Ernest Winterton, secretary of the Leicestershire Temperance Union, said he wished to oppose the application…and said besides appearing as a member of the public he also appeared for Mr. Elijah Higgitt, of Loughborough, and other members of the Loughborough Temperance Federation”…

In 1911 Elijah, now aged 77 was still living by “private means” along with his wife Mary Ann, now aged 60, at 12 Forest Road Loughborough, having been married for 23 years, but with no children. They were being cared for by two servants; Martha Tuckwood, aged 24, Cook , Domestic, and Emma Bailey, aged 30, General servant Domestic.

Elijah Higgitt’s second wife Mary Ann (nee Clemerson) died on December 15th 1916 aged 66, and Elijah Higgitt himself died in Loughborough on April 7th 1918 aged 84. According to the National Probate Calendar (Index) of Wills and Administration)… “HIGGITT Elijah of 12 Forest-road Loughborough Leicestershire died 7 April 1918 Probate London 8 August to Arthur William Higgitt schoolmaster. Effects £6,015 19s. 9d.”…

It was ironic that Elijah’s only surviving son and beneficiary, Arthur William Higgitt, was to die himself just four years later on November 23rd 1922, age 63, leaving everything to his widow Mary Jane. According to the National Probate Calendar (Index) of Wills and Administration)… “HIGGITT Arthur William of Chislehurst 51 Nottingham-road Ilkeston Derbyshire died 23 November 1922 Probate Derby 20 March to Mary Jane Higgitt widow. Effects £5,728 9s. 10d.”…

Arthur William’s widow, Mary Jane Higgitt (nee Philpott) died on December 22nd 1926, leaving her estate to her only surviving child, Walter Henry Higgitt. Arthur and Mary had two children according to the 1911 census, but only one was still alive.

According to the National Probate Calendar (Index) of Wills and Administration)… “HIGGITT  Mary Jane of Chislehurst 51 Nottingham-road Ilkeston Derbyshire died 22 December 1926 at 6 Kelham-lane Newark, Nottinghamshire Probate Nottingham 9 February to Walter Henry Higgitt Engineer Effects £4,078 15s. 5d.”…

Elijah Higgitt’s eldest son Richard Henry Higgitt had died in the December quarter of 1905 aged 48 years and his widow, Maude Beatrice, according to the 1911 census had taken over the running of a boarding house at 12 Drummond Road Ilkeston with her son, Arthur Henry, a music hall vocalist. Maude, like her sister-in-law Mary Jane had given birth to two children but only one had survived.

And now to Mount Street and Jonty Trot